Foods to Avoid If You Have High Triglycerides: from WebMD.com

I begin to learn about that triglycerides is also a bad cholesterol in addition to a more known bad cholesterol called low-density lipoprotein (LDL).  I need to keep a healthy level of cholesterol to avoid the potential heart attack or stroke in the next ten years.  “Triglycerides are another type of fat, and they’re used to store excess energy from your diet. High levels of triglycerides in the blood are associated with atherosclerosis.”, according to American Heart Association’s web page here http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Cholesterol/AboutCholesterol/Good-vs-Bad-Cholesterol_UCM_305561_Article.jsp#.

I quote some information from the above web page, then I copy the entire article from a WebMD.com web page titled “Foods to Avoid If You Have High Triglycerides” here http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/ss/slideshow-triglyceride-foods-to-avoid?ecd=wnl_chl_121515&ctr=wnl-chl-121515_nsl-ld-stry_title&mb=WYQVza0sEXokrko1%40IKOxShonS%2fH3cwyXPseqP5xtN0%3d.

Quote from American Heart Association’s web page:

Cholesterol can’t dissolve in the blood. It must be transported through your bloodstream by carriers called lipoproteins, which got their name because they’re made of fat (lipid) and proteins.

The two types of lipoproteins that carry cholesterol to and from cells are low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, and high-density lipoprotein, or HDL. LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol, along with one fifth of your triglyceride level, make up your total cholesterol count, which can be determined through a blood test.

LDL (Bad) Cholesterol

LDL cholesterol is considered the “bad” cholesterol because it contributes to plaque, a thick, hard deposit that can clog arteries and make them less flexible. This condition is known as atherosclerosis. If a clot forms and blocks a narrowed artery, heart attack or stroke can result. Another condition called peripheral artery disease can develop when plaque buildup narrows an artery supplying blood to the legs.

HDL (Good) Cholesterol

HDL cholesterol is considered “good” cholesterol because it helps remove LDL cholesterol from the arteries. Experts believe HDL acts as a scavenger, carrying LDL cholesterol away from the arteries and back to the liver, where it is broken down and passed from the body. One-fourth to one-third of blood cholesterol is carried by HDL. A healthy level of HDL cholesterol may also protect against heart attack and stroke, while low levels of HDL cholesterol have been shown to increase the risk of heart disease.

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are another type of fat, and they’re used to store excess energy from your diet. High levels of triglycerides in the blood are associated with atherosclerosis. Elevated triglycerides can be caused by overweight and obesity, physical inactivity, cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption and a diet very high in carbohydrates (more than 60 percent of total calories). Underlying diseases or genetic disorders are sometimes the cause of high triglycerides. People with high triglycerides often have a high total cholesterol level, including a high LDL cholesterol (bad) level and a low HDL cholesterol (good) level. Many people with heart disease or diabetes also have high triglyceride levels.

Quote from the article “Foods to Avoid If You Have High Triglycerides

1. Starchy Veggies

Some vegetables are better than others when you’re watching your triglycerides. Limit how much you eat of those that are starchy, like corn and peas. That way, your body won’t turn the extra starch into triglycerides. There are plenty of other options, like cauliflower, kale, and mushrooms, to choose from.

2. Baked Beans With Sugar or Pork Added

Beans have fiber and other nutrients going for them. But if they’re made with sugar or pork, they may not be the best choice. The label on the can should say what’s in there, and how much sugar and fat you’re getting. Switch to black beans, which are a great source of fiber and protein, without saturated fats or added sugar.

3. Too Much of a Good Thing

No doubt: Fruit is good for you, especially if you’re having a piece of fruit instead of a rich dessert. But when you have high triglycerides, you may need to limit yourself to 2-3 pieces of fruit a day. That way, you won’t get too much of the natural sugars that are in fruit. If you’re having dried fruit, remember that the serving size is much smaller: 2 tablespoons of raisins, for example.

4. Alcohol

You may think of alcohol as being good for your heart. But too much of it can drive up your triglyceride levels. That’s because of the sugars that are naturally part of alcohol, whether it’s wine, beer, or liquor. Too much sugar, from any source, can be a problem. Your doctor may recommend that you not drink at all if your triglyceride levels are very high.

5. Canned Fish Packed in Oil

Fish is good for your heart. But when you’re buying canned fish, check the label to see if it’s packed in oil. You’re better off buying canned fish that’s packed in water. Usually, both are available on the same shelf at the grocery store.

6. Coconut

Coconut is trendy. You can find coconut milk, coconut water, coconut flakes, coconut oil, and the fruit itself. Some say coconut has health benefits, but it’s also high in saturated fats, so ask your doctor if you should limit it or avoid it completely.

7. Starchy Foods

Eat too much pasta, potatoes, or cereals and your body can turn them into triglycerides. You can still have them, but you have to stay within proper serving sizes. A serving is a slice of bread, 1/3 cup of rice or pasta, or half a cup of potatoes or cooked oatmeal.

8. Sugary Drinks

A lot of the sugar you get may come from a glass. Whether you drink sweet iced tea, regular soda, fruit juice, or a syrupy coffee drink, you may be getting more sweetness than your body can handle. It may turn some of that sugar into triglycerides. So when you’re cutting back on sugar, remember to include your drinks in that, too. Limit yourself to no more than a cup (8 ounces) of sugar-sweetened drinks per day.

9. Honey or Maple Syrup

You may think of honey and maple syrup as being healthier or more natural than refined sugar. But like sugar, they can raise your triglyceride levels. When you’re working on lowering your triglycerides, cut down on sugary sweeteners across the board, even if they’re not table sugar.

10. Baked Goods

Because of your high triglycerides, you should limit the saturated fat in your diet. That includes the saturated fat in the butter that’s baked into pastries. You should also avoid trans fats altogether. Check the nutrition facts label to be sure.

11. High-Fat Meats

You don’t have to give up meat completely. But you should choose lean cuts and trim any visible fat. Meat has saturated fat in it, so you want to limit that as much as possible to help bring your triglyceride levels down.

12. Butter or Margarine

Use olive oil as a replacement for butter and margarine, which may have too much saturated fat or trans fat, when cooking meats and vegetables or making salad dressing. Canola, walnut, and flaxseed oils are also great alternatives.

 

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