Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic: My favorite

Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic is a recording that I often listen to; I particularly like the second movement “Largo”; I thus list the second movement link here first, then the entire symphony.

Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” – II. Largo (Karajan)

Quote from Wikipedia:

The theme from the Largo was adapted into the spiritual-like song “Goin’ Home”, often mistakenly considered a folk song or traditional spiritual, by Dvořák’s pupil William Arms Fisher, who wrote the lyrics in 1922

The entire “Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic”:

Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic

Quote from Wikipedia: Antonín Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9 in E minor, “From the New World”, Op. 95, B. 178

The Symphony No. 9 in E minor, “From the New World”, Op. 95, B. 178 (Czech: Symfonie č. 9 e moll „Z nového světa“), popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 while he was the director of the National Conservatory of Music of America from 1892 to 1895. It is by far his most popular symphony, and one of the most popular of all symphonies. In older literature and recordings, this symphony was often numbered as Symphony No. 5. Neil Armstrong took a recording of the New World Symphony to the Moon during the Apollo 11 mission, the first Moon landing, in 1969.

The symphony was commissioned by the New York Philharmonic, and premiered on December 16, 1893, at Carnegie Hall conducted by Anton Seidl. A day earlier, in an article published in the New York Herald on December 15, 1893, Dvořák further explained how Native American music had been an influence on this symphony:
I have not actually used any of the [Native American] melodies. I have simply written original themes embodying the peculiarities of the Indian music, and, using these themes as subjects, have developed them with all the resources of modern rhythms, counterpoint, and orchestral colour.

Dvořák did, it seems, borrow rhythms from the music of his native Bohemia, as notably in his Slavonic Dances, and the pentatonic scale in some of his music written in America from African-American and/or Native American sources.

Dvořák was influenced not only by music he had heard, but by what he had seen, in America. He wrote that he would not have composed his American pieces as he had, if he had not seen America.[15] It has been said that Dvořák was inspired by the American “wide open spaces” such as prairies he may have seen on his trip to Iowa in the summer of 1893.[16] Notices about several performances of the symphony include the phrase “wide open spaces” about what inspired the symphony and/or about the feelings it conveys to listeners.

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