Quote from “Signs You’re Not Getting Enough Protein”

I was asking about what signs could indicate protein deficiency yesterday, 4/7/2019, and the daily mail from Time magazine appears in my email Inbox today.
Quote from “Signs You’re Not Getting Enough Protein” on https://www.webmd.com/diet/ss/slideshow-not-enough-protein-signs?ecd=wnl_chl_040719_REMAIL&ctr=wnl-chl-040719-REMAIL_nsl-Bodymodule_Position2&mb=WYQVza0sEXokrko1%40IKOxShonS%2fH3cwyXPseqP5xtN0%3d:
. How Much [protein] Do You Need? You should get a minimum of 10% of your daily calories from protein. (For a target of grams, multiply your weight in pounds by 0.36.) And you want it from a variety of sources throughout the day: A tub of low-fat Greek yogurt for breakfast has about 20 grams; a serving of skinless chicken breast at lunch, about 25 grams; and a cup of black beans in your dinner, about 15 grams. Your body breaks down and reuses the protein in many ways.
. Swelling One of the most common signs that you’re not getting enough protein is swelling (also called edema), especially in your abdomen, legs, feet, and hands. A possible explanation: The proteins that circulate in your blood — albumin, in particular — help keep fluid from building up in your tissues. But many things can cause edema, so be sure to check with your doctor in case it’s more serious.
. Mood Changes. Hair, Nail, and Skin Problems. Weakness and Fatigue. Hunger. Slow-Healing Injuries: People who are low on protein often find their cuts and scrapes take longer to get better. The same seems to be true of sprains and other exercise-related mishaps. It could be another effect of your body not making enough collagen. It’s found in connective tissues as well as your skin. To make blood clot, you need proteins, too.
. Getting or Staying Sick. Who Might Come Up Short? Most Americans get plenty of protein. People who don’t get enough usually have an overall poor diet. Elderly people and people with cancer may have trouble eating as much protein as they need.
. What About Athletes? If you exercise regularly and eat a balanced diet, you’re probably fine. But serious athletes with strenuous training schedules do need more protein — about twice as much as the average person, or roughly 0.5-1 gram of protein for every pound of body weight each day. Don’t overdo it though. Too much protein can also cause problems.