My self-reminder: Be respectful to every mountain, plus Amazing Grace hymn

The Everest Southeast Ridge route, Nepal

I have to keep reminding myself of this practice: Be very respectful to every mountain. Quote from reading “Everest through the eyes of a Sherpa: ‘Climbers need to wake up’, By Pradeep Bashyal BBC Nepali, Kathmandu, 8 June 2019 on https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-48464030

. Amazing Grace – Nana Mouskouri- HD 1080P with lyrics: https://youtu.be/sweGOc–kZY


. Mostly young men, Sherpa guides are not just the muscle behind any expedition – carrying extra gear such as oxygen bottles, water and food – they are also expert navigators. Enduring freezing temperatures of -30C down to -50C, they help climbers to negotiate icefalls, avalanches and extreme altitude. From Camp 4 up to the summit, climbers will enter what is commonly known as the “death zone”. Operating above 8,000m, 95% of climbers will rely on supplementary oxygen carried in bottles. Sherpas must ensure their clients conserve their oxygen supply for the return journey.”I keep checking everyone’s oxygen levels, and in the event of extreme weather, I make strategic decisions about whether we ascend or descend to avoid any developing situations in the mountains,” explains Kami.

. Although the climbing season is short, often only a single week in mid-May, Sherpas look after the mountain for a total of three months. As well as fixing ropes and ladders before climbers arrive, they also undertake a huge clean-up operation, clearing the tonnes of rubbish left behind on the mountain.

. Although the climbing season is short, often only a single week in mid-May, Sherpas look after the mountain for a total of three months. As well as fixing ropes and ladders before climbers arrive, they also undertake a huge clean-up operation, clearing the tonnes of rubbish left behind on the mountain.

. It’s the Sherpas who guide foreign climbers all the way to the summit who make the most money, bringing home between $5,000 (£3,960) to $8,000 (£6,330) in a single season.
. Since Kami Rita’s first ascent in the mid-1990s, technologies such as weather prediction systems, helicopters, climbing gear and satellite communications have all revolutionised the adventure industry. But rather than alleviating the demands on them, Sherpas say they have only increased.With growing numbers of aspiring climbers arriving year upon year, more mountain guides are needed than ever before. This year [2019] 381 climbing permits were issued on the Nepal side, the highest since records began in 1953.Tour companies charge visitors anywhere between $30,000 and $130,000 or more, in return for organising their permits, equipment, finding a guide, and ensuring an emergency plan is in place. This also includes an $11,000 fee which goes directly to the Nepalese government.High-end luxury packages may include up to as many as five Sherpas per climber to manage bespoke demands such as unlimited bottled oxygen, more comfortable tents or even hot showers.

2 thoughts on “My self-reminder: Be respectful to every mountain, plus Amazing Grace hymn

  1. About the Sherpas: Would it not be useful to add another prepaid fee of $11,000 package to every Sherpa on that person’s team? to be paid by each climber or expedition? This fee could be added to the first $11,000 fee paid to the government. Then any Sherpa on the mountain, surviving or not, would be assured of fail pay and their family would have enough to survive if they die on the mountain. Useful.

    On Mon, Jun 10, 2019 at 7:29 AM Renchan Li’s (李仁長) WordPress site wrote:

    > Li, Renchan (李仁長) posted: ” The Everest Southeast Ridge route, Nepal I > have to keep reminding myself of this practice: Be very respectful to every > mountain. Quote from reading “Everest through the eyes of a Sherpa: > ‘Climbers need to wake up’, By Pradeep Bashyal BBC Nepali, Kath” >

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    1. Gwen, Glad to know that you are interested in this Sherpas story. I don’t know about the ideal economic considerations involved in the pay system, but I feel that it is always the Sherpas that is paid the least because they are at the end of the pay stream.

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