Reading “WHY PANCREATIC CANCER IS SO DEADLY”

Quote from “WHY PANCREATIC CANCER IS SO DEADLY” on https://www.wktv.com/content/news/506823052.html

The future of treatment
Researchers are working on better understanding the way in which pancreatic tumors grow and spread, Libutti said. There is also a lot of research focused on finding better treatments, targeted therapies, immune therapy, improving surgery and radiation therapy, according to the American Cancer Society.

“There are a number of agents that are being looked at in clinical trials that focus on pathways that may allow pancreatic cancer to evade normal processes,” Libutti said.

Another line of research is focused on finding biomarkers of pancreatic cancer so that a simple blood or urine test could be developed. Unlike screenings for other conditions such as colon, breast and prostate cancers, there is no routine way to see whether a patient has a tumor in the pancreas.

The future of medicine to help people with pancreatic cancer will involve genetics, Banck said. This would involve matching a person’s particular type of tumor using genomic information with treatment.

“What’s going to make real difference in the future is the revolution of the genomic era,” she said.

Want to get an energy, play this “Stand By You”

A favorite workout tune for my mom: “Rachel Platten – Stand By You (Official Music Video)” 我媽媽的運動音樂,必播!必播!https://youtu.be/bwB9EMpW8eY 🥰🥰🥰😘😘😘

Picture of Rachel Platten
Picture of the singer Rachel Platten

Lyrics of Stand by You by Rachel Platten:

Hands, put your empty hands in mine

And scars, show me all the scars you hide

And hey, if your wings are broken

Please take mine so yours can open too

‘Cause I’m gonna stand by you

Oh, tears make kaleidoscopes in your eyes

And hurt, I know you’re hurting, but so am I

And love, if your wings are broken

Borrow mine so yours can open too

‘Cause I’m gonna stand by you

Even if we’re breaking down, we can find a way to break through

Even if we can’t find heaven, I’ll walk through hell with you

Love, you’re not alone, ’cause I’m gonna stand by you

Even if we can’t find heaven, I’m gonna stand by you

Even if we can’t find heaven, I’ll walk through hell with you

Love, you’re not alone, ’cause I’m gonna stand by youYeah, you’re all I never knew I needed

And the…

Elīna Garanča – Ave Maria

How romantic this “Elīna Garanča – Ave Maria(HD)” is, am I wrong? I just want to cry. https://youtu.be/ypMv_vKtGuk?list=RDVf42IP__ipw

Quote from Wikipedia: Elīna Garanča is a Latvian mezzo-soprano. She began to study singing in her hometown of Riga in 1996 and continued her studies in Vienna and in the United States. By 1999 she had won first place in a significant competition in Finland and had begun a career in Europe. Source: Wikipedia

Lyrics
Ave Maria, maiden mild
Oh, listen to a maiden’s prayer
For thou canst hear amid the wild
‘Tis thou, ’tis thou canst save amid, despair
We slumber safely till the morrow
Though we’ve by man outcast reviled
Oh maiden, see a maiden’s sorrow
Oh mother, hear a suppliant child
Ave Maria
Ave Maria gratia plena
Maria gratia plena
Maria gratia plena
Ave ave dominus, dominus tecum
The murky cavern’s air so heavy
Shall breathe of balm if thou hast smiled
Oh maiden, hear a maiden pleadin’
Oh mother, hear a suppliant child
Ave Maria
Ave Maria

Puccini: “O mio babbino caro” / Fleming · Marin · Berliner Philharmoniker

Puccini: “O mio babbino caro” / Fleming · Marin · Berliner Philharmoniker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sf-tjXevlyQ

Renee Fleming, The American Soprano

Quote of O mio babbino caro from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lyrics:
Oh my beloved father,
I love him, I love him!
I’ll go to Porta Rossa,
To buy our wedding ring.

Oh yes, I really love him.
And if you still say no,
I’ll go to Ponte Vecchio,
And throw myself below.

My love for which I suffer,
At last, I want to die.
Father I beg, I beg.
Father I beg, I beg.

***
“O mio babbino caro” (“Oh my dear papa”) is a soprano aria from the opera Gianni Schicchi (1918) by Giacomo Puccini to a libretto by Giovacchino Forzano. It is sung by Lauretta after tensions between her father Schicchi and the family of Rinuccio, the boy she loves, have reached a breaking point that threatens to separate her from Rinuccio. It provides an interlude expressing lyrical simplicity and love in contrast with the atmosphere of hypocrisy, jealousy, double-dealing, and feuding in medieval Florence. It provides the only set-piece in the through-composed opera.

Florence Easton as Lauretta at the world premiere of Gianni Schicchi, 14 December 1918
The aria was first performed at the premiere of Gianni Schicchi on 14 December 1918 at the Metropolitan Opera in New York by the popular Edwardian English soprano Florence Easton. It has been sung by many sopranos. Dame Joan Hammond won a Gold Record in 1969 for 1 million sold copies of this aria.[1]

The aria is frequently performed in concerts and as an encore in recitals by many popular and crossover singers. It is used in several films, and some bands cover the aria in their own style.

*** Renée Lynn Fleming (born February 14, 1959) is an American opera singer and soprano.[1] Fleming has a full lyric soprano voice.[2] She has performed coloratura, lyric, and lighter spinto soprano operatic roles in Italian, German, French, Czech, and Russian, aside from her native English. She has also sung chansons, jazz and indie rock. She speaks fluent German and French, along with limited Italian. Her signature roles include Countess Almaviva in Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro, Desdemona in Verdi’s Otello, Violetta in Verdi’s La traviata, the title role in Dvořák’s Rusalka, the title role in Massenet’s Manon, the title role in Massenet’s Thaïs, the title role in Richard Strauss’s Arabella, the Marschallin in Der Rosenkavalier, and the Countess in Capriccio.

A National Medal of Arts and Richard Tucker Award winner, she regularly performs in opera houses and concert halls worldwide. In 2008, she was awarded the Swedish Polar Music Prize for her services in music. In 2010, she took the title of ‘Creative Consultant’ to the Lyric Opera of Chicago, the first person to hold such a title with the company.

Conductor Sir Georg Solti said of Fleming, “In my long life, I have met maybe two sopranos with this quality of singing; the other was Renata Tebaldi.”[2]

My life’s battle hymn: “Battle Hymn of the Republic”

The United States Army Field Band performs “Battle Hymn of the Republic”. Lyrics by Julia Ward Howe; Music by William Steffe; Setting by Peter J. Wilhousky and Arranged by James Neilson. Led by First Lieutenant Alexandra Borza. https://youtu.be/Jy6AOGRsR80

The United States Army Field Band performs "Battle Hymn of the Republic"
The United States Army Field Band performs “Battle Hymn of the Republic” https://youtu.be/Jy6AOGRsR80

Quote from Wikipedia: “The “Battle Hymn of the Republic”, also known as “Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory” outside of the United States, is a lyric by the abolitionist writer Julia Ward Howe using the music from the song “John Brown’s Body”. Howe’s more famous lyrics were written in November 1861 and first published in The Atlantic Monthly in February 1862. The song links the judgment of the wicked at the end of the age (Old Testament, Isaiah 63; New Testament, Revelation 19) with the American Civil War. “

Lyrics: Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord; He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored; He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword; His truth is marching on. Glory! Glory! Hallelujah! Glory! Glory! Hallelujah! Glory! Glory! Hallelujah! His truth is marching on. I have seen Him in the watch-fires of a hundred circling camps; They have builded Him an altar in the evening dews and damps; I can read His righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps, His day is marching on. I have read His fiery gospel writ in rows of burnished steel! “As ye deal with my condemners, so with you My grace shall deal! Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the serpent with his heel, ” Since God is marching on. He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat; He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgment seat; Oh, be swift, my soul, to answer Him; be jubilant, my feet! Our God is marching on. In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me; As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free! While God is marching on.